Helsinki Bus Station Theory

(Posted by Sara O’Connor)

I love the idea of this theory, but wonder if it’s true.

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I know that there is such a lot of talent out there, and I feel strongly that very often the reason writers aren’t finding success is down to the ideas they spend their on.

When I read this article, part of me shouted, “Yes!” I can see how following this theory could lead people to that place of originality, to finding the idea that makes everyone sit up and say, “Wow, that’s different!” It just makes sense to me that spending the time – a lot of time – on one thing could change the way you see it so much that your ideas will capture the elusive attention of the masses.

But in the past, I’ve often told people to try new things, to not be stuck in the same genre, the same age range. And I still feel that is true, too. Variety could help you find the thing that really clicks with you.

But what if switching is an easy way out? After all, you loved that area of writing enough to write a whole book in it. I’m so torn.

So, go and read the article and tell me what you think below!

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Top Five Reasons To Write In January

Grey days, dark nights, dry January – urgh. This is the month after Christmas festivities that can seem relentless and totally uninspiring as we wait for the days to grow longer and for Spring to send out its tendrils of hope and light.

This should be a really bad time to be writing. Right? Wrong. Here are our top five reasons why January is the writer’s friend.

You’re Skint

You’ve spent all your money on presents and Baileys and pay day is still a long way off. How to entertain yourself? Writing is free. Knuckle down to a first draft and be grateful that there’s no compound interest on a word count.

You Hate Other People

A festive period spent in the company of close family and friends can leave you with a strong desire never to have another conversation with another person ever again. Channel your inner grump and shut yourself away at your desk. If anyone dares to knock on the door and offer you a cup of tea, swear viciously at them for interrupting your creative flow. Dickens never had to put up with this.

Healthy Living Stinks

This is the month when we’re all encouraged to go on diets and visit the gym. Don’t be brainwashed. Sit at your desk, plump up the cushions, buy an extra tin of biscuits and set to on that last chapter. Celery may be calorie negative, but how many authors ever thanked a vegetable on the acknowledgments page?

The Weather’s Foul

Cold snaps are sent for a reason; to keep you at your desk. Mother Nature is encouraging you to write a scene that involves some dramatic pathetic fallacy. Or a short spell of rain.

Short Days

Short winter days can be much more productive than long summer evenings. Summer is notoriously disastrous for creativity and the scourge of productivity. There’s a sudden urge to lounge on a picnic blanket, drinking Pimms. So enjoy these short, barren evenings  when there’s nothing left to do but write by the light of a sputtering candle.

This can also be the month when you put plans into action. You could do worse than apply for a place on the 2016 Book Bound writers retreat. We might even supply a tin of biscuits…

What are your tips for January productivity?